Thursday, December 31, 2015

And Finally - Hal Miller

This final installment in a quartet of posts on the Municipal Council blog prior to my exiting the Council follows from reading that was underway prior to my joining the Council four years ago. I express gratitude to Karen Tapahe, the Council’s Community Relations Coordinator extraordinaire, for her kindness is arranging for my posts to appear.

The reading I refer to began many years ago in the heat of an academic controversy over the extent to which intellectual performance (sometimes referred to as IQ) is heritable. Two books by my doctoral-dissertation advisor Richard Herrnstein (including one co-authored with Charles Murray) fueled the controversy. Herrnstein is now deceased, but Murray recently authored a follow-up book entitled Coming Apart in which he explored sociocultural issues, especially those involving social class, more deeply than he and Herrnstein had previously. That earlier work had focused directly on the relation between ethnicity and intellectual performance.

Provology 101 - Parks and Recreation

Provology 101, a series of classes that give a behind-the-scenes look at how Provo City runs, has given City departments the chance to show and tell about what they do for Provo. One of the participants, Anona Sobczak, has been sharing her experiences on Facebook and gave us permission to share them with you.

October 21, 2015
Can I just say that it was the show "Parks and Recreation" that inspired me to learn more about city government and get involved in the city? The world of city involvement was so foreign to me before I watched the show, and it really gave me the framework of how it functioned. Also super funny, of course.
For hour 1 of class last night we got to hear from the director of Parks and Recreation, Roger Thomas. Since I mentally gave him the best PowerPoint presentation award, I was sad to hear that he is retiring in December. The Rec Center was the foremost topic on our minds. The Rec Center was voted for overwhelmingly by citizens (we're so smart!), cost $39.5 million, and they stayed on budget! Director Thomas toured 50 different facilities to combine the best features of each, which has resulted in what he believes is the best rec center in the U.S., and it will hold that title for a few more years at least, until cities coming to check out our center model their centers after ours.

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Provo Municipal Council Inauguration

On Tuesday, January 5, 2016, the Provo Municipal Council will hold a formal inauguration of Council members elected in the November 2015 general election.

Gary Winterton, District 1, and Kay Van Buren, District 4, were elected to a second term on the Council. New members Dave Knecht, Dave Harding, and George Stewart were elected to represent District 3, District 5, and City Wide District II, respectively. All will serve four year terms with the exception of Harding, who is serving the final two years in the District 5 seat left vacant by the passing of Stephen Hales. Knecht and Stewart are returning to the Council after having served previously.

The inauguration will begin at 3:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at 351 West Center Street. Bill Hulterstrom is serving as master of ceremonies. The Provo Police and Fire Department Joint Honor Guard will be joined by members of the Provo High School Chamber Singers for the opening ceremony. Provo Justice Court Judge Romney will administer the oath of office.

An open house will be held after the formal portion of the event until 4:30 p.m. The regular Council meeting will commence at 5:30 p.m.

Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Provology 101 - Provo Power

Provology 101, a series of classes that give a behind-the-scenes look at how Provo City runs, has given City departments the chance to show and tell about what they do for Provo. One of the participants, Anona Sobczak, has been sharing her experiences on Facebook and gave us permission to share them with you.

October 15, 2015

Tonight we met with the moneymaker of the city, Provo Power. While about 50% of property here is exempt from property taxes, (think LDS church & school buildings) everyone has to pay for power, so they rake in about 71 million each year. Out of this, 8 million goes right to the General Fund to pay for police, fire, etc. In comparison, the city brings in only 4 million from property taxes.
Sounds good to be the head of Provo Power, right? Until you have to sign a 4 million dollar power bill each month and set up camp in a decrepit RC Willey building. Yes, their old home is now a construction site, with the towers due to be imploded next spring. First scaffolding will go up and all the asbestos paint taken off so we don't all get lung cancer.

Saturday, December 26, 2015

Provology 101 - Community Development and Economic Development

Provology 101, a series of classes that give a behind-the-scenes look at how Provo City runs, has given City departments the chance to show and tell about what they do for Provo. One of the participants, Anona Sobczak, has been sharing her experiences on Facebook and gave us permission to share them with you.

October 7, 2015

In an ironic twist of fate, I was late for the presentation by the Community Development department due to attending a Community Development meeting that ran two hours long. What a fascinating department though--a strange mix of tedious city code interpretation and high drama between neighbors.
What I did make it in time for was a quick education on having project cars parked at your house (two max, behind a screened fence), xeriscaping (you can't just put in rocks), minor and major home occupation licenses (this is what the conflict at my meeting centered around), and over-occupancy (hard to enforce).

Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Provology 101 - Public Works

Provology 101, a series of classes that give a behind-the-scenes look at how Provo City runs, has given City departments the chance to show and tell about what they do for Provo. One of the participants, Anona Sobczak, has been sharing her experiences on Facebook and gave us permission to share them with you.

October 1, 2015
Council Members tour water tank

Below the glistening sands of the MTC beach volleyball courts lies a buried behemoth, a structure of immense antiquity and cryptic beauty. This little-known piece of construction is the oldest water tank in Provo City, built out of concrete in 1930.

Tuesday, December 8, 2015

New Energy Conservation Codes for Buildings

At the December 1, 2015, Council Meeting, a joint resolution was passed by the Mayor and Council (5-2) outlining their support for the adoption of the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and other possible air quality enhancements for Utah.

The Utah Governor’s Office of Energy Development reports that adoption of the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) would save each new Utah homeowner $297 per year; and analysis conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory finds that the 2015 IECC is cost-effective for new commercial buildings and homes, resulting in positive cash flow within two years for new home buyers.

Because air pollution gravely threatens the health of the people of Utah County as well as economic development and homes and buildings now account for 39% of air pollution in Utah according to the Utah Division of Air Quality, energy-efficient new homes and commercial buildings represent an important long-term air pollution reduction strategy by reducing energy consumption and resulting pollution emissions over the 100+ year life of building structures.

It is estimated that adoption of the 2015 IECC would reduce CO2 pollution in Utah by an estimated 5.06 million metric tons by 2040, the equivalent of taking over 84,000 cars off of the road every year; and would reduce by 1,502 tons Utah’s emissions of direct pollution and precursors of PM2.5 and ozone, both grave health threats, by 2050. Improved energy efficiency will also buffer against spikes in utility rates by reducing demand for energy by 7.57 trillion BTU, consequently mitigating the need for utility companies to build new energy infrastructure and pass those costs on to consumers. It is far more cost-effective to build-in energy efficient, air pollution reduction technologies during construction, rather than retrofitting a home after it is constructed.

More information on this issue is available from Utah Clean Energy.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Comment below (requires Google+ account), on our Facebook page, through our online comment form, or by contacting Council Members directly. Comments/input on items appearing on an upcoming meeting agenda will be compiled and provided to Council Members the day before the meeting. **Note - your comments will be part of the public record.

Summary of the December 1 Council Meetings

In the Work Session

Transportation and Mobility Advisory Committee:
Members from the Transportation and Mobility Advisory Committee (TMAC) met jointly with the City Council. Discussions included the Bicycle Master Plan, Transportation Master Plan, and Bus Rapid Transit. TMAC members also explained their priorities and challenges.

Meeting Recordings:
Discussed an update to the video and audio recordings and the Council minutes policy. The Council requested research on digital storage costs as they consider where, in what format, and for how long to retain video and audio recordings of their meetings.

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Council Counsel


Strictly, a council is not in the business of counsel but of deliberation and decision making.  Provo City’s Municipal Council advises the City’s administration and consents (or not) to the administration’s proposals through the legislative devices of resolution and ordinance.

The line between advice and counsel (or advise and counsel) admittedly is thin.  The boundary may be limned by reference to the policy governance of the Council.  It is typical that the Mayor informs the Council of potential proposals in order to receive advice from its members—advice offered from the perspective of the Council’s policies.  Revision and further review of a proposal may follow in an iterative cycle.  Ultimately, a proposal is withdrawn, or it proceeds to a Council vote. 

Saturday, November 28, 2015

Provology 101 - Provo Airport

Provology 101, a series of classes that give a behind-the-scenes look at how Provo City runs, has given City departments the chance to show and tell about what they do for Provo. One of the participants, Anona Sobczak, has been sharing her experiences on Facebook and gave us permission to share them with you.

I travel a lot, but this was the fastest I've ever gotten through security! We went behind the scenes at the Provo Airport (Part of the Public Works Department) and found out some interesting things. Did you know there is a moat around the airport? For security, but primarily to keep water off the runway. Also, I've always wondered how they can tell if you've paid for parking at the airport. Apparently they have a printout of what spots are paid for, and if your car is parked in a spot that hasn't been paid for, you get towed. The airport's commitment was to keep their parking fees half the price of the SLC airport, and they earn 110,000 a year in parking fees.

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Please Join Us to Say Farewell




We invite you to join us in saying farewell to three Council Members whose terms of service have come to an end. Hal Miller, Calli Hales, and Gary Garrett chose not to run for reelection and will be honored in a brief reception at the beginning of the December 1, 2015, Council Meeting.

Join us at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, December 1, to offer thanks for their service on the Provo City Council and best wishes for the future. Miller and Garrett each served four year terms and Hales is completing a ten month term after being appointed to fill the vacancy left by Stephen Hales' passing.



* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Comment below (requires Google+ account), on our Facebook page, through our online comment form, or by contacting Council Members directly. Comments/input on items appearing on an upcoming meeting agenda will be compiled and provided to Council Members the day before the meeting. **Note - your comments will be part of the public record.

Provology 101 - Redevelopment Agency

Provology 101, a series of classes that give a behind-the-scenes look at how Provo City runs, has given City departments the chance to show and tell about what they do for Provo. One of the participants, Anona Sobczak, has been sharing her experiences on Facebook and gave us permission to share them with you.

Dramatic "before and after" pictures were the order of the day with the Redevelopment Agency of Provo. I love the outside of the Pioneer Bookstore on Center street--it's a very visible example of a project done through the redevelopment agency. Other visible examples: the downtown Conference Center, the property south of the tabernacle/temple which got sold to the LDS Church, the Maeser School homes, and the Taylor House (Habitat for Humanity).

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Summary of the November 17 Council Meetings

In the Work Session

Neighborhood Program update:
Council Member Dave Sewell presented Neighborhood Program ordinance revisions from the Neighborhood Evaluation Committee. Changes were made for clarity on Neighborhood Chair duties and to encourage the election of Vice Chairs in each neighborhood. Vice Chairs can help take on some of the work and/or can help represent other viewpoints within the neighborhood. Creating a business liaison position was also added to support the program's purpose of involving all stakeholders in the neighborhood. The ordinance revisions will be presented formally at the December 1 Council Meeting.

Council Priorities:
The Council's Executive Director presented a timeline for working on the "balanced mix of housing"priority. Council Members will address the questions the Director put forward and continue work to develop strategies.

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Provo City Council Work Session - November 17, 2015

Part 1 - technical difficulties with the Internet connection led to the broadcast being cut short

Part 2
  Agenda 

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Provology 101 - Provo Library

Provology 101, a series of classes that give a behind-the-scenes look at how Provo City runs, has given City departments the chance to show and tell about what they do for Provo. One of the participants, Anona Sobczak, has been sharing her experiences on Facebook and gave us permission to share them with you.

"Are you getting your money's worth?" We all drove to the Provo Library, where Joella Peterson asked us this question several times. HUGE BIAS ALERT I am on the library board, so I naturally thought it was a great class session. Did you know that a portion of your property tax goes to the library, and that income from late books/materials is less than 1/18th of the library's total funding? The librarians don't have to be nice to you, because they get your money whether you come to the library or not. But you may as well come, because they are nice and you should get your money's worth. I should mention here that Gene Nelson, the Library Director, prides himself on watching the budget closely. Actually I've been surprised at how many departments in the city make a point of being very careful with the taxpayer's money. I guess I hear about wasteful government so much that I had this stereotype in my mind.

How Today’s Municipal Council Governs



“How to govern?” may be among the first questions a Municipal Councilor asks. In Provo, the answer to the question appears in the state legislative code and the municipal code, which address issues of the structure of municipal government, duties of the municipal council, and sundry related matters. A variant of the question—“How does the Municipal Council govern itself?—is not answered in the same sources. Consulting the Provo City Municipal Council Handbook may be helpful.

Thursday, November 5, 2015

Next Steps for Provo's RAP Tax

The 2015 General Election brought voter approval of the Provo's recreation, arts, and parks (RAP)
tax. This is an increase to the sales tax of 1 penny for every $10 of sales in Provo. It will be in effect for 10 years and would end at that time unless renewed by voters.

What happens next?
  1. The Canvass of Election will be held November 17 to certify the election results
  2. At the November 17 Council Meeting the ordinance authorizing the RAP tax would be passed by the Council
  3. Provo City is required to provide notice to the Utah State Tax Commission of the enactment of the RAP tax. The Tax Commission administers, collects, and distributes the tax.
  4. The RAP tax would be effective on sales in Provo beginning April 1, 2016. 
  5. On April 26, 2026, the tax would effectively end. The City Council could choose to place it on the ballot for voters to approve it for another 10 years.
We're grateful to all those who gave us input during the process of deciding whether or not to place the RAP tax on the ballot. Your ideas and suggestion help us to know where the funds can best be spent as we discover the needs of the community.  We are also looking forward to receiving updates from Mayor Curtis and the Parks and Recreation Department on the use of these funds.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Comment below (requires Google+ account), on our Facebook page, through our online comment form, or by contacting Council Members directly. Comments/input on items appearing on an upcoming meeting agenda will be compiled and provided to Council Members the day before the meeting. **Note - your comments will be part of the public record.

Monday, October 26, 2015

Provology 101 - Police Department, Courts


Provology 101, a series of classes that give a behind-the-scenes look at how Provo City runs, has given City departments the chance to show and tell about what they do for Provo. One of the participants, Anona Sobczak, has been sharing her experiences on Facebook and gave us permission to share them with you.


September 17, 2015

Provology 101: We went to the police station then we went to court! Hopefully not a recurring thing for us. The police department was fascinating. The officers seemed amped up from an earlier chase down of a fugitive/escapee who had assaulted a police officer in Oregon, I'll have to see if it's in my paper today. They were generally optimistic about the city as they presented with a pinch of humor thrown in. We tried on some body armor, then learned about the wide range of services the police provide. We have a population of around 120,000 people and 105 officers for all those people. Most other cities would have around 187 officers for that population. In 2014 there were 65,535 calls for service. Wow!

Provology 101 - New Class, Fire Department

For over a month now a select group of Provo residents has been participating in Provology 101, a series of classes that give a behind-the-scenes look at how Provo City runs. This small group meets every Wednesday for two hours and their responses have been very rewarding. As each department shows some of what they do for the City, participants have been receptive and positive about the experience.

One of the participants, Anona Sobczak, has been sharing her experiences on Facebook and gave us permission to share them with you.

Thursday, October 22, 2015

Summary of the October 20 Council Meetings

In the Work Session

Zoning Summit:
The Council's Policy Governance Committee, in conjunction with Don Jarvis and the City's administration, has created a draft agenda for a proposed zoning summit. This would be sponsored by the Council and would offer speakers and workshops. The target date for this event is December 3, 2015. Council members gave their support of continuing to put this event together.

Council Priorities:
Council members continued their discussion on priorities and have selected "balanced mix of housing" as the first priority to begin focusing on, starting with a discussion in the November 17 Work Meeting. In December, the Council will discuss another priority, "Provo west side development."

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Provo City Council Work Session - October 20, 2015


Agenda  (Times have been added to the ends of the individual agenda items to help you find them in the video.)

Thursday, October 15, 2015

How to Get an Exemption for the Noise Ordinance

The city has a well established noise policy found in chapter 9.06 of our code book. The amount of noise that is acceptable is determined by the decibels produced. A chart on the Mayor's blog (http://provomayor.com/2014/07/31/how-do-i-get-an-exemption-to-the-noise-ordinance/) outlines the acceptable level of decibels (day is from 7:00 am to 10:00 pm). The ordinance does allow for exceptions for sounds created by parades, carnivals, special public social events, or special construction projects.

An exemption is granted by a permit from the Mayor. If you are interested in an exemption you must complete two tasks. First, obtain written permission from the Neighborhood Chair over the area where the event will be held. Fill out this form and the City Council office will contact the Neighborhood Chair for you. After hearing back from the Neighborhood Chair, your request will be forwarded to the Mayor's office. You can start this process by filling out the form at http://bit.ly/ProvoNoise. Please submit your request at least two weeks before your event to allow us enough time to get the required permissions.

Each exemption is issued under the condition that it can be revoked. It is expected that during the event the applicant will work with police if complaints are filed to accommodate the reasonable needs of neighbors.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Comment below (requires Google+ account), on our Facebook page, through our online comment form, or by contacting Council Members directly. Comments/input on items appearing on an upcoming meeting agenda will be compiled and provided to Council Members the day before the meeting. **Note - your comments will be part of the public record.

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Summary of the October 6 Council Meetings

In the Work Session

Joint Meeting with the Landmarks Commission:
Council Members met with the members of the Landmarks Commission to discuss current priorities, any issues or problems with the current code that might hinder the Commission's ability to protect properties, and other items of common interest.

Provo City Center Temple open house:
In anticipation of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints' open house for their new temple in downtown Provo, a committee of City and community representatives have been meeting and preparing for the impact this will have on Provo. Subcommittees were formed to address public safety, parking and mobility, beautification, downtown promotion and impacts, media/public outreach, protest policies, and event planning. Wayne Parker has been in contact with the LDS Church and they are anticipating 880,000 visitors during the open house. Parking areas have been arranged for and ticket holders will be assigned a lot for parking. The Church estimates 25,000 volunteers will be needed to staff the event.

New Neighborhood Chairs elected

Three Provo neighborhoods held elections recently to choose a new Neighborhood Chair. Vice Chairs were also elected to help with the work involved. They will serve four-year terms and provide a crucial point of contact for their neighborhoods.

David Wright is the new Rock Canyon Neighborhood Chair, taking over for Maureen LaPray.

Mary Millar is the new Spring Creek Neighborhood Chair, replacing Tim Brough.

Robbie Potter is the new Dixon Neighborhood Chair, taking over for David Harding.

Congratulations to these new Chair and many thanks to the previous Chairs for their years of helpful service to their neighborhoods and Provo City. For more information about the Neighborhood Program, maps showing the boundaries, and contact information for Neighborhood Chairs and Vice Chairs, visit our website.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Comment below (requires Google+ account), on our Facebook page, through our online comment form, or by contacting Council Members directly. Comments/input on items appearing on an upcoming meeting agenda will be compiled and provided to Council Members the day before the meeting. **Note - your comments will be part of the public record.

Monday, September 21, 2015

A Primer of Provo’s Municipal Government




Traveling on the Frontrunner north or south takes one through multiple municipalities, allowing comparative views from the rails—sometimes cramped and weed-covered, other times expansive and manicured.  Only a municipal councilor likely would also notice that the succession of communities represents a succession of different forms of municipal government as well.  The brief ride between Provo and Orem is illustrative.  Provo’s government exemplifies the Council-Mayor form of government and Orem’s the Council-Manager form, two of the five forms defined by the Utah League of Cities and Towns.

What is often perceived as a seamless visual transition between Orem and Provo belies their differences in governmental structure and in the consequences for administrative dynamics and policy making within each city.  My observations here are of Provo following nearly four years as a member of its Municipal Council. 

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Summary of the September 15 Council Meetings

In the Work Session

Joint Meeting with the Planning Commission:
The Council met with members of the Planning Commission to discuss the Planning Commission having an increasingly proactive role in developing land use policy recommendations to the Council. They also discussed the use of Development Agreements as well as recommendations for city code amendments where development outcomes are not producing the desired results. A video recording of this meeting is available.

Downtown Provo, Inc:
Brady Curtis from Downtown Provo, Inc. (DPI) delivered a quarterly report on their budget and activities. DPI has been involved with some very successful events and Curtis explained some of the positive and negative impacts on businesses in the area of an event. He recommended that the large events be scheduled for slower days like Saturday and Sunday to minimize the negative effects of street closures. He also mentioned the frustrations of restaurant owners when events like the Rooftop Concert Series bring in food trucks. Some restaurants have learned ways to cope with the situation and make bigger efforts to draw people in.

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

A legislative lobby -- in Provo?

The issue of lobbyists is longstanding, and divided between those who view them as essential to democracy and those who eschew lobbyists as a curse on the process.

Recently, a novel approach to lobbying — the People’s Lobby — took flight for the first time in Provo. The concept is the brainchild of Dr. Jeff Swift, a BYU graduate, whose subsequently published doctoral dissertation at North Carolina State University described both the concept and its implementation as a means for citizens — the people — to experience grassroots lobbying first-hand.

The Provo City People’s Lobby is a scaling back of Swift’s vision of a statewide, citizen-driven legislative initiative to a municipality-sized version. In the former, the state legislature agrees to consider legislative proposals from the People’s Lobby in the course of a formal session. In the Provo version, the Municipal Council agreed to consider proposals from the People’s Lobby in the course of its regular legislative activity.

Ordinarily, proposals originate with the city administration or council committees. The People’s Lobby offers a direct, citizen-driven path to the council’s legislative agenda.

Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Provo Bike to School Week 2015


As part of Vision 2030, Provo City established some goals regarding transportation. One is to promote the use of transit and alternate modes of transportation. Another involves complete street design parameters in conjunction with building new developments. Expanding bike lanes and paths increases the use of clean transportation. In the goals for family and neighborhoods, one of the objectives is to create and maintain bike trail and sidewalk systems that connect all parts of Provo. 

By keeping our eyes on this vision for Provo's future, we hope to increase health, safety, and connectivity among our residents. One of the great events that falls in line with this vision is Bike to School Week. Happening next week, students are encouraged to take the Bike-to-School Challenge and ride their bikes to school. Some great prizes are available and the school with the most bicycles for the week will win the Rad Riders Award.

Check with your school to see how they are participating. You can contact your school's PTA president or Aaron Skabelund of the Provo Bicycle Committee at a.skabelund@gmail.com for more information. Visit bikeprovo.org to find out more about Bike to School Week.



* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Comment below (requires Google+ account), on our Facebook page, through our online comment form, or by contacting Council Members directly. Comments/input on items appearing on an upcoming meeting agenda will be compiled and provided to Council Members the day before the meeting. **Note - your comments will be part of the public record.

Summary of the September 1 Council Meetings

In the Work Session

Provo Historic Tour:
The Landmarks Commission gave a demonstration of a mobile app they've been working on that explores historic buildings in Provo's downtown. In addition to information and historic photos, users can use the slider under the first photo for each site to fade back and forth between historic and current photographs. Audio narration is included for each of the sites on the tour. This app is currently only available for Android devices but they plan to develop one for the iOS (Apple) system as well. Council Member Calli Hales mentioned how important this project was to her late husband, Stephen.

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Provo City Council Work Session - September 1, 2015



Agenda  (Times have been added to the ends of the individual agenda items to help you find them in the video.)

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Board of Canvassers - August 25, 2015


Agenda
5:30 pm, Tuesday, August 25, 2015
  1. Roll Call
  2. Opening Prayer
  3. A resolution of the Mayor and the Municipal Council sitting as the Board of Canvassers accepting the election returns and declaring and certifying the election returns and declaring and certifying the results of the vote for elections held for District 3, and Council City-Wide II, Provo, Utah
  4. Adjournment

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Comment below (requires Google+ account), on our Facebook page, through our online comment form, or by contacting Council Members directly. Comments/input on items appearing on an upcoming meeting agenda will be compiled and provided to Council Members the day before the meeting. **Note - your comments will be part of the public record.

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Summary of the August 18 Council Meetings

In the Work Session

Continuing discussion on User Fees:
The Council has been reviewing the user fees in Provo City in order to discuss the purpose and necessity of each fee. The goal is to keep the fees fair and competitive while also being cost-effective. While some fees may cover all the costs associated with a service or use, others do not and the City must decide whether the fee needs to change, be subsidized, or some other option considered.

At this Work Session, the airport and the library presented information about their various user fees. The airport showed a comparison of their rates with those of other municipal airports. The library explained the reasoning behind the rates they charge to rent rooms and the most recent change to rental rates made in January of this year. Council Members referred these items to the Budget Committee for further review and the Committee will return to a future Work Session to give their recommendations.

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Provo City Council Work Session - August 18, 2015



Agenda  (TImes have been added to the ends of the individual agenda items to help you find them in the video.)

Monday, August 10, 2015

Neighborhood Program Calendar

We've had requests for easier ways to find the information on upcoming Neighborhood Meetings. When the City Council office is notified of an upcoming meeting, it will be added to the following calendars:
  • Provo City calendar (on the city's website) - you can simplify the events shown on the calendar by selecting a category or department to display from the drop-down boxes at the top of the calendar.

  • Neighborhood Program Calendar (shown on a page on this blog and the Council's blog) - this is a Google calendar so you can subscribe to the calendar if you wish



* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Comment below (requires Google+ account), on our Facebook page, through our online comment form, or by contacting Council Members directly. Comments/input on items appearing on an upcoming meeting agenda will be compiled and provided to Council Members the day before the meeting. **Note - your comments will be part of the public record.

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Town Hall Meeting Questions

As part of our efforts to reach out to Provo residents and answer their questions about the recently passed city budget, we held a Town Hall Meeting at the Provo Library. This included a quick presentation on some of the budget highlights and then moved into a panel discussion where Council Members answered questions from those in attendance as well as questions submitted online.

A video recording of the panel discussion is available but we wanted to share some of the questions and answers as well.*

Summary of the August 4 Council Meetings

In the Work Session


Council Priorities:
Council Members had their first group discussion of Council priorities for the 2015-2016 fiscal year. Many ideas came forward but several priorities seemed to show more interest than others: Finding a way to achieve a balanced mix of housing in the city, Provo west side development, economic development and expanded retail, and fiscal responsibility in general. Hal Miller was not present and will still need to make his preferences known. This discussion will continue at future Work Meetings.

Mayor's RAP Tax proposal:
The Mayor presented an updated proposal on the recreation, arts, and parks (RAP) tax and how the funds would be used if the tax is approved by the Council and Provo voters. After meeting with Council Members and reviewing the results of the survey conducted last month, Mayor Curtis made adjustments to the plan. Council Members and the Council Budget Committee will review the proposal in anticipation of the Council making a formal decision on whether or not to put the RAP tax on the November ballot.

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

Provo City Council Work Session - August 4, 2015



Agenda  (Times have been added to the ends of the individual agenda items to help you find them in the video.)

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Voting in Provo

http://provo.org/departments/city-recorder/electionsElection season is underway and we've had a few people asking for more information on voting dates, poll locations, and who the candidates are.

Provo City has a website with the information you need as well as links to the Utah County Election Office where you can request an absentee ballot. Several neighborhoods are hosting "Meet the Candidate" nights. Watch the calendar for one in your area.

The Mayor's blog has also provided videotaped interviews of candidates.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Comment below (requires Google+ account), on our Facebook page, through our online comment form, or by contacting Council Members directly. Comments/input on items appearing on an upcoming meeting agenda will be compiled and provided to Council Members the day before the meeting. **Note - your comments will be part of the public record.

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Town Hall Meeting

http://provocitycouncil.blogspot.com/2015/07/how-will-utility-rate-increase-impact-me.htmlThe Council Office has been hosting a series of budget information booths to help Provo citizens better understand the recently approved Provo City Budget. A Town Hall Meeting is being held on Wednesday, July 29, at the Bullock Room of the Provo Library. The event will begin at 6:00 pm and discussion with City Council members, including a question and answer session, will begin at 7:00 pm.


UPDATE: There were some technical issues at the beginning of the broadcast and viewers were unable to see the initial budget presentation. Here is the presentation (without audio commentary):

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Summary of the July 21 Council Meetings

In the Work Session


Joint Meeting with the Airport Board:
The Council met with the Airport Board to discuss the Airport Master Plan, how the airport is doing, and visions for the future. Council Members also wanted to know how they could be supportive of the Board's efforts.

Covey Center for the Arts:
Paul Duerden, Covey Center Manager, was asked to offer the opening prayer for the meeting. Afterward, he presented some information on how the Covey Center is doing and the variety of activities happening there. Over 160 performances were staged in the last fiscal year. The building hosts performing groups, concerts, theatrical productions, art displays, classes, and workshops. Community partnerships are being developed that are mutually beneficial to local performing groups and to Provo City. The Covey Center is also able to attract acts and shows that would normally be at large arenas like the Maverik Center or Energy Solutions Arena.

How Will the Utility Rate Increase Impact Me?

As the City Council has reviewed the Fiscal Year 2016 budget over the past few months, Provo residents have had questions about the utility rate increases that were part of the budget.  Although the budget submitted by the Mayor included a five-year plan for rate increases in several utilities, the Council approved only the first year's increase when passing the budget.

To help Provo residents understand these rate increases, we are providing this calculator to help you estimate your future utility bills using the rates approved in the FY2016 budget. The new rates take effect beginning July 1, 2015, and appear beginning on your July 2015 utility bill. In addition, this calculator estimates your FY2020 monthly utility bill, using the rates proposed for the fiscal year 2020.

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Joint Meeting with the Airport Board - July 21, 2015





PROVO MUNICIPAL COUNCIL/ AIRPORT BOARD Work Meeting
11:30 AM, Tuesday, July 21, 2015
Room 310, City Conference Room
351 West Center Street, Provo, Utah
 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Comment below (requires Google+ account), on our Facebook page, through our online comment form, or by contacting Council Members directly. Comments/input on items appearing on an upcoming meeting agenda will be compiled and provided to Council Members the day before the meeting. **Note - your comments will be part of the public record.

Provo City Council Work Session - July 21, 2015



Agenda  (Times have been added to the ends of the individual agenda items to help you find them in the video.)

Monday, July 20, 2015

Wasatch Neighborhood Parking Permit Program


During the May 19th Work Session, Council Member Kim Santiago presented a proposal for a Wasatch Neighborhood Parking Program to stem some of the issues related with on-street parking in the Wasatch Neighborhood. As required by City Code, that plan proposal was submitted to the Provo City Parking Committee for review.

At the July 7th Work Session, the Provo City Parking Committee returned to the Council to provide their analysis of the plan and proposed recommendations. After hearing the proposed details of the Wasatch Neighborhood Parking Plan, the Municipal Council passed Resolution 2015-39 indicating their intent to create a permit parking program in the Wasatch Neighborhood at the July 7th Council Meeting. A final action creating an ordinance will be required to complete the action to implement a parking plan. A public hearing to provide public comment at a hearing held on Tuesday, August 4, 2015, beginning at 5:30 P.M. in the Council Chambers at the City Center Building, 351 W Center St.

A mailing detailing the specifics of the plan was sent to all residents and property owners within the area. Those materials, which outline the specific details of the proposal, can be found below:






* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Comment below (requires Google+ account), on our Facebook page, through our online comment form, or by contacting Council Members directly. Comments/input on items appearing on an upcoming meeting agenda will be compiled and provided to Council Members the day before the meeting. **Note - your comments will be part of the public record.